zeldathemes
officialcrow:

nothing i expected. everything i wanted

officialcrow:

nothing i expected. everything i wanted

idiotsonfb:

idiotsonfb:

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unite4humanity:

Just so we’re all clear.

unite4humanity:

Just so we’re all clear.

iraffiruse:

Frozach Submitted

alternativeblackgirl:

jatel0:

For The Masses:
http://gen.lib.rus.ec
http://textbooknova.com
http://en.bookfi.org/
http://www.gutenberg.org
http://ebookee.org
http://www.manybooks.net
http://www.giuciao.com
http://www.feedurbrain.com
http://oll.libertyfund.org/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=380
http://www.alleng.ru/ 
http://www.eknigu.com/ 
http://ishare.iask.sina.com.cn/
http://2020ok.com/
http://www.freebookspot.es/Default.aspx
http://www.freeetextbooks.com/
http://onebigtorrent.org/
http://www.downeu.me/ebook/
http://forums.mvgroup.org
http://theaudiobookbay.com/
More Here

Reblog to save a life.

alternativeblackgirl:

jatel0:

For The Masses:

http://gen.lib.rus.ec

http://textbooknova.com

http://en.bookfi.org/

http://www.gutenberg.org

http://ebookee.org

http://www.manybooks.net

http://www.giuciao.com

http://www.feedurbrain.com

http://oll.libertyfund.org/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=380

http://www.alleng.ru/ 

http://www.eknigu.com/ 

http://ishare.iask.sina.com.cn/

http://2020ok.com/

http://www.freebookspot.es/Default.aspx

http://www.freeetextbooks.com/

http://onebigtorrent.org/

http://www.downeu.me/ebook/

http://forums.mvgroup.org

http://theaudiobookbay.com/

More Here

Reblog to save a life.

dutchster:

"Gay people are ruining the sanctity of marriage"

image

mindblowingscience:

Treated Fracking Wastewater is Still Toxic

A new study has shockingly shown that fracking wastewater, even after being treated, is still contaminating drinking water.
Wastewater from hydraulic fracturing, or “fracking,” and its toxic byproducts have long been an issue, especially for those who are concerned that flowback may be contaminating their groundwater.

Fracking involves injecting millions of gallons of fluids into shale rock formations to release oil and gas. The wastewater generated during this process is highly radioactive and contains high levels of heavy metals and salts called halides, like bromide, chloride and iodide. The most traditional approach to dealing with this wastewater is to treat it in municipal or commercial treatment plants and then release it into rivers and other surface waters.
But the problem is, as described in the American Chemical Society journal Environmental Science & Technology, the new research has found that discharge of fracking wastewaters to rivers, even after passage through wastewater treatment plants, could be putting the drinking water supplies of downstream cities at risk.
So how are these chemicals slipping through the cracks? Researchers have raised concerns that, as stated in the press release, that plants aren’t efficient at removing halides. Typical treatment methods involve chlorination or ozonation, but this can lead to the formation of toxic byproducts.
To test the effectiveness of these methods, researchers diluted river-water samples of fracking wastewater discharged from operations in Pennsylvania and Arkansas. Then, after using current drinking-water disinfection methods on the samples, they found that even at concentrations as low as 0.01 percent up to 0.1 percent by volume of fracking wastewater, a host of toxic compounds formed.
Their recommendation to eliminate this problem is to do away with discharging fracking wastewater into surface waters all together, or implementing specific halide-removal techniques to all future water treatment.

mindblowingscience:

Treated Fracking Wastewater is Still Toxic

A new study has shockingly shown that fracking wastewater, even after being treated, is still contaminating drinking water.

Wastewater from hydraulic fracturing, or “fracking,” and its toxic byproducts have long been an issue, especially for those who are concerned that flowback may be contaminating their groundwater.

Fracking involves injecting millions of gallons of fluids into shale rock formations to release oil and gas. The wastewater generated during this process is highly radioactive and contains high levels of heavy metals and salts called halides, like bromide, chloride and iodide. The most traditional approach to dealing with this wastewater is to treat it in municipal or commercial treatment plants and then release it into rivers and other surface waters.

But the problem is, as described in the American Chemical Society journal Environmental Science & Technology, the new research has found that discharge of fracking wastewaters to rivers, even after passage through wastewater treatment plants, could be putting the drinking water supplies of downstream cities at risk.

So how are these chemicals slipping through the cracks? Researchers have raised concerns that, as stated in the press release, that plants aren’t efficient at removing halides. Typical treatment methods involve chlorination or ozonation, but this can lead to the formation of toxic byproducts.

To test the effectiveness of these methods, researchers diluted river-water samples of fracking wastewater discharged from operations in Pennsylvania and Arkansas. Then, after using current drinking-water disinfection methods on the samples, they found that even at concentrations as low as 0.01 percent up to 0.1 percent by volume of fracking wastewater, a host of toxic compounds formed.

Their recommendation to eliminate this problem is to do away with discharging fracking wastewater into surface waters all together, or implementing specific halide-removal techniques to all future water treatment.

You sing, you dance, you act, you basically do everything. Is there anything you can’t do?

afro-dominicano:

Twists of NGC 3718 by Mark Hanson

A careful look at this colorful cosmic snapshot reveals a surprising number of galaxies both near and far toward the constellation Ursa Major.

The most striking is NGC 3718, the warped spiral galaxy near picture center. NGC 3718’s spiral arms look twisted and extended, mottled with young blue star clusters. Drawn out dust lanes obscure its yellowish central regions. A mere 150 thousand light-years to the right is another large spiral galaxy, NGC 3729.

The two are likely interacting gravitationally, accounting for the peculiar appearance of NGC 3718. While this galaxy pair lies about 52 million light-years away, the remarkable Hickson Group 56 can also be seen clustered above NGC 3718, near the top of the frame. Hickson Group 56 consists of five interacting galaxies and lies over 400 million light-years away.

There are over 5000 galaxies in this image down to 24th magnitude.

broral:

pissyeti:

when someone stops talking to you and youre not sure what you did wrong

image

image

buckydixon:

blazer-replies:

spookyram:

romanimperial:

whatsayyousir:

teatray-inthesky:

image

image

image

image

image

image

forever reblog

ALWAYS REBLOG.

iT GOT BETTER

FUCK LOL

ill-ary:

'Meet the Generation of Incredible Native American Women Fighting to Preserve Their Culture' via Marie Claire (x)

sundxwn:

Yosemite Valley - Twilight Fog by Darvin Atkeson

sundxwn:

Yosemite Valley - Twilight Fog by Darvin Atkeson

givemehappypill:

A photo I took in the lovely old town of Saarburg in Germany, where there is a waterfall in the middle of the pedestrian area. 

givemehappypill:

A photo I took in the lovely old town of Saarburg in Germany, where there is a waterfall in the middle of the pedestrian area.